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The nose as a tool for sexual stimulation

The nose as a tool for sexual stimulation

The nose as a tool for sexual stimulation

In 1995, Hirsch conducted a study of 31 Chicago men ages 18 to 64 asking them to smell 46 odors and combination scents, including perfumes and foods.

 

  • The pumpkin pie-lavender mixture increased male arousal — as measured by penile blood flow — an average of 40 percent.
  • The black licorice-doughnuts mixture increased male arousal an average of 32 percent.
  • The pumpkin pie-doughnuts combination increased male arousal an average of 20 percent.
  • The smell of buttered popcorn increased male arousal an average of 9 percent; cheese pizza, an average of 5 percent; baked cinnamon buns, an average of 4 percent; and women’s perfume an average of 3 percent.
  • The licorice-cola combination increased arousal more than either odor alone.
  • Older men responded more strongly to vanilla than did younger men.
  • Men who said they were satisfied with their sex lives showed a greater response to the strawberry scent.
  • Men who had the most active sex lives responded most strongly to the lavender scent as well as Oriental spice and cola.
  • No odor diminished male arousal.

In 1997, Hirsch conducted research to gauge women’s sexual response to certain scents. He recruited 30 women between 18 and 40 and gauged their arousal by measuring blood flow to the vagina.

Odors tested included charcoal barbecue smoke, mesquite barbecue smoke, cucumber, cherry, lemon, banana nut bread, pumpkin pie, lavender, Good & Plenty licorice candy, cranberry, baby powder, sweet pea, parsley, coconut, green apple, baked cinnamon buns, peach, Oriental spice fragrance, grape, chocolate, root beer, cappuccino, gardenia and other perfumes and colognes.

 

Now, although no odor diminished male arousal, certain odors did diminish female arousal.

The scent of cherry decreased women’s arousal an average of 18 percent and charcoal barbecue smoke decreased women’s arousal an average of 14 percent.

Men’s colognes decreased women’s arousal an average of 1 percent.

The Good & Plenty candy-cucumber combination increased female arousal an average of 13 percent, as did the scent of baby powder.

The Good & Plenty-banana nut bread mixture increased female arousal an average of 12 percent.

The pumpkin pie-lavender combination increased female arousal an average of 11 percent.

The baby powder-chocolate combination increased female arousal an average of 4 percent. Women’s perfumes increased female arousal an average of 1 percent.

 

 

Hirsch has even formulated colognes called SA for Men and SA for Women — the SA stands for sexual arousal — based on his results:

 

SA For Men, which is designed to attract women, includes a mixture of citrus, baby powder and Good & Plenty scents.

 

SA For Women, which is designed to attract men, includes a mixture of cucumber, lavender and pumpkin pie scents.

 

The scent of a Valentine’s Day favorite — chocolate — didn’t trigger high sexual responses from men or women. However, don’t dismiss chocolate out of hand. Its powers, when eaten, are more chemical. Chocolate can alter a person’s mood and change the way a person feels. Chocolate contains the stimulant caffeine and phenylethylamine, which is similar to amphetamine substances, and has an arousing effect.

 

Garlic bread at dinner.

Through research, Hirsch has learned that the smell and taste of garlic bread at dinner has improved positive interactions among family members by about 8 percent and decreased negative interactions by 22 percent. In fact, garlic bread most reduced the negative interactions of the dominant male at the table.

In other research, Hirsch found that married and single women want their husbands’ or lovers’ kisses to taste fresh, clean and minty, like toothpaste. Husbands prefer their wives’ kisses taste like spearmint or peppermint, and single men prefer to have their dates’ kisses taste like — alcohol.

Use this to your advantage. Go fourth and prosper.